Why Garissa University College reopening brings mixed feelings for Kenyans

About 9 months after the unfortunate terrorist attack that took the lives of 147 students and left 79 injured, the Garissa University College has resumed activities. Students are expected to resume fully on the 11th of January this year.

The 2015 attack, which has been described as one of the deadliest in country, was carried out by the Al-Shabaab terrorist group and led to the closure of the university and other schools in the area. Even though the Kenyan government has boosted security in the campus and the town, over 600 students have transferred to its sister school, Moi University, while some have refused to return.

To support the students that were injured in the attack, the French government has set up a fund putting 150,000 Kenyan Shillings towards each student’s tuition fees and living allowance for the year.

There are mixed reactions towards the news of the institution’s opening. While some people feel the reopening has come too soon, others are of the opinion that reopening the university is sending a message of resilience to the terrorists. These concerns are legitimate because Al-Shabaab continues to attack security officials at the Somalia border, however, it is evident that the government and the people of Kenya are doing all that they can to prevent a re-occurrence of terrorist attacks.

The post Why Garissa University College reopening brings mixed feelings for Kenyans appeared first on Ventures Africa.