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1 week 4 days ago
Planner and educator Toni Griffin walks down her block in Harlem. Image © Naima Green Planner and educator Toni Griffin walks down her block in Harlem. Image © Naima Green

Griffin founded the consultancy Urban Planning for the American City, which she complements with her pedagogical work at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design.

Since its emergence with the cultural turn in the 1970s and ’80s, spatial justice has become a rallying cry among activists, planners, and plugged-in architects. But as with many concepts with academic origins, its precepts often remain elusive and uninterrogated. Though some of this has changed with the advent of city- and place-making discourse, few are doing as much to lend articulation, nuance, and malleability to spatial justice as Toni Griffin. A Chicago native, Griffin practiced architecture at SOM for nearly a decade before leaving the city to work as a planner in Newark and Washington, D.C., among other municipalities. In 2009, she founded the consultancy Urban Planning for the American City, which she complements with her pedagogical work at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. There, she runs the Just City Lab, which, through research and a host of programs, aims to develop, disseminate, and evaluate tools for enhancing justice—and remediating chronic, systematized injustice—in America’s cities. But what form could justice take in the U.S. context, and how can architects and designers help? Metropolis spoke with Griffin about how focusing on inclusivity and embracing interdependence and complexity are parts of the answer.

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1 week 4 days ago
© Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar © Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar

There is often a debate on whether architects and engineers should restore old buildings and preserve what is still standing as a token of the past, or completely demolish them and introduce contemporary designs and features. In Iran, the remains of historic monuments, some of which are World Heritage Sites, have yet to know their fate, as restoration strategies remain uncertain.

As part of his Retrofuturism series, Iranian architect Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar selected a few pre-Islamic castles across Persian towns, and merged them with contemporary landmarks, bringing about a new definition of architectural restoration.

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1 week 4 days ago
© Fernando Alda © Fernando Alda
  • Architects: Ventura Arquitectos
  • Location: Aldea Zama, Tulum, Q.R., Mexico
  • Category: Apartments
  • Team: Jaime Ventura, Thomas Zambrano, Fernando Sánchez
  • Area: 1790.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2019
  • Photographs: Fernando Alda

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1 week 4 days ago
Wexner Center for the Arts. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/75905404@N00/3484952969'>Flickr user OZinOH</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Wexner Center for the Arts. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/75905404@N00/3484952969'>Flickr user OZinOH</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>

Whether built, written or drawn, the work of renowned architect, theorist and educator Peter Eisenman (born 11th August 1932) is characterized by Deconstructivism, with an interest in signs, symbols and the processes of making meaning always at the foreground. As such, Eisenman has been one of architecture's foremost theorists of recent decades; however he has also at times been a controversial figure in the architectural world, professing a disinterest in many of the more pragmatic concerns that other architects engage in.

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