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UNStudio Designs Future-Proof Cable Car for Amsterdam

18 June, 2018 - 14:00
Courtesy of Plompmozes Courtesy of Plompmozes

UNStudio has released images of its design for IJbaan, a green, future-proof cable car linking West and North Amsterdam. The result of a crowdfunding campaign started by founders Bas Dekker and Willem Wessels in 2015, the project is to be implemented by 2025, marking the city's 750th anniversary. The “all electric” transport scheme forms part of Amsterdam’s ambition to be a European center for urban innovation, integrating forward-thinking technology with existing public transport modalities.

Stretching over one mile (1.5 kilometers), the cable car links the two thriving residential districts of Amsterdam-West and Amsterdam-Noord through a system of three slender pylons and two stations. The cable car has been designed to accommodate a future third station depending on the pattern of growth for surrounding districts.

Courtesy of Plompmozes Courtesy of Plompmozes

In order to allow large ships to pass under the IJ waterway, the towers vary in height between 150, 340, and 450 feet (46, 105, and 136 meters). The towers draw inspiration from the ports and ship cranes which define Amsterdam’s industrial heritage, with a sculptural form striking a balance between playfulness and elegance. 

Courtesy of Plompmozes Courtesy of Plompmozes

Meanwhile, the two stations are designed to be more than transport hubs but to become destinations in their own right. The Amsterdam-West station features a vibrant urban plaza along the water with restaurants and bars, while the Amsterdam-Noord offers a viewpoint for the “blossoming cultural hotspot in the North.” 

Courtesy of Plompmozes Courtesy of Plompmozes

A cable car is an extremely sustainable public transport system. It is a very fast and green way of traveling, which is attractive for cyclists, commuters, students, residents, and visitors. In Amsterdam, you see a growing need for connections across the IJ, with the new metro and bridges. The city is growing enormously and such an 'air bridge' contributes to the development of the entire region. Transport by air also relieves the increasing pressure on traffic and the existing transport network on the ground. It is not only efficient but also fun. People are going to see and experience their city in a whole new way.
-Ben van Berkel, Founder, UNStudio

Courtesy of Plompmozes Courtesy of Plompmozes

The journey is expected to take under five minutes, traveling at an average speed of over 20 kilometers per hour. Cabins will have a capacity of between 32 and 37 passengers, with additional cycle cabins for up to six bikes.

Courtesy of UNStudio Courtesy of UNStudio Courtesy of UNStudio Courtesy of UNStudio

For the scheme’s design, UNStudio were able to draw on previous knowledge of cable car design, having won a competition for the design of a three-kilometer-long cable car system in Gothenburg, Sweden earlier this year.

News via: UNStudio

How Can We Fix the Architecture Crit? First, Ask for Evidence

18 June, 2018 - 09:00
© Andrea Vasquez © Andrea Vasquez

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "To Fix Architecture, Fix the Design Crit."

In architecture, the act of formally critiquing design is ubiquitous. The crit, as its called, is almost a rite of passage. And while the format of this practice is universal, its objective, goals and ultimate purpose are unfixed, beyond a broad and often vague imperative to make a given design better. This is a problem, because it leaves a foundation of the profession to take the form of whatever discussion happens to arise between a designer and a critic. If the expectation of empirical evidence for design decisions were introduced as the basis of a design crit, the cumulative effects of this change could improve the credibility of the entire discipline.

Whether in a working group, a studio classroom or a client meeting, a staple of architectural design occurs when a proposal is evaluated by someone who didn’t create it. As architecture’s native and relatively unique form of peer review, this practice is useful, but also remarkable in lacking a burden of proof for the claims of designers or critics. Despite being widespread, the rigor of the design crit rests on a disconnected patchwork of participants’ personal experience, beliefs and speculation.

This lack of an empirical basis is damaging. Both an expectation of evidence and an aptitude for applying it is de rigueur in disciplines like medicine, education and law, fields with an equally fundamental impact on the public as the provision of shelter. Practitioners in these fields are frequently tasked with drawing from, and contributing to, a formalized, common body of knowledge when making decisions.

"Architects who specialize in healthcare, workplace, and educational facilities regularly face clients who derive their demands from a methodical, well-informed understanding of how patients, employees or students use their spaces". Image © Andrea Vasquez "Architects who specialize in healthcare, workplace, and educational facilities regularly face clients who derive their demands from a methodical, well-informed understanding of how patients, employees or students use their spaces". Image © Andrea Vasquez

It’s been pointed out repeatedly that both architectural practice and education lack a consistent, widespread system of research, analysis and reporting in their work, as well as the culture to even value such a thing. Certain parts of the profession, however, have been doing this independently for some time. Architects who specialize in healthcareworkplace, and educational facilities are no strangers to the term “evidence-based design,” and regularly face clients who derive their demands from a methodical, well-informed understanding of how patients, employees or students use their spaces.

Architects in these areas of practice are frequently expected to validate the basis of many of their design decisions as completely as possible, and have thus developed their own systematic methods to reach evidence-based conclusions and report their findings back into a shared bank of knowledge for other designers to draw on in the future. What’s notable about this development is that the profession has only embraced such a system when other disciplines have demanded it for the design of their spaces. Despite existing for decades, the practice of evidence-based design has never caught on across the entire profession.

This reactive stance may be a significant force at work in the fracturing of the profession into specialized sub-disciplines that’s also occurred over the past few decades, ceding many of an architect’s traditional responsibilities to consultants. In light of this, it seems a proactive embrace of an evidence-based system of practice could substantially help architectural design retain independent value. What makes such a system difficult to implement is that it requires more than just a knowledge of designing spaces—it also requires deep knowledge, and training, in conducting structured, effective research and reporting.

"Evidence-based practice requires the learning of skills—of evidence finding, understanding, interpreting, evaluating and using". Image © Andrea Vasquez "Evidence-based practice requires the learning of skills—of evidence finding, understanding, interpreting, evaluating and using". Image © Andrea Vasquez

Fortunately, this can be taught. Basic research methods are already a standard part of training for many other disciplines, so there are plenty of existing examples for architecture to follow. As noted by architect Barrie Evans when considering a comparable use of research in the medical field, “...evidence-based practice requires the learning of skills—of evidence finding, understanding, interpreting, evaluating and using. These skills may seem basic but they do need teaching, as they are in medicine.”

Architecture education runs into problems introducing new material, due to time constraints. Studio class schedules are already lengthy, but much of that time is spent on individual design crits while remaining students either observe or wait patiently at their desks. Watching someone else be critiqued is a worthy form of education, but considering this sort of activity can occupy the vast majority of a student’s class time with a relatively small amount of that time being spent on their own crit, it’s easy to see a point of diminishing returns in this format. It’s not hard to imagine existing studio class schedules recalibrated to include a significant, consistent amount of instruction in conducting research methods.

Where this new knowledge can be best refined is within the crit itself, which, even if the time currently devoted to it was cut in half, would still be a primary component of architectural education. With a solid base of instruction in research methods, the purpose of the design critique can be modified specifically to evaluate the use of empirical evidence in design decisions, as opposed to speculating on open-ended claims. Of course, not all design choices can be fully substantiated, but if the basis of the critique prioritized evidence-based decisions over conjectural ones, it could become a bridge between the critical thinking needed for well-structured research and the creative thinking necessary to turn that research into a design solution.

Though if it starts there, the need for this form of design crit extends beyond education. Graduates would bring the expectation of verifiable claims for design decisions with them into practice. That’s where the effectiveness of reforming this act begins to take hold, as the design critique is equally fundamental to professional practice as it is to education, even if it only occurs in five-minute bursts between two architects or in occasional client meetings. If the point of this act was modified to focus on the substantiated claims employed in making design decisions while the rest of it remains ostensibly intact, an evidence-based culture of design could quickly spread throughout the profession.

It’s precisely because the design crit is central to the practice of architecture that this change could reform the entire profession in a way that would make evidence-based design the norm. If this were the case, architectural design would necessarily become far more robust and relevant for the people it serves, putting the profession in a more valuable and trustworthy position than it is today.

Ross Brady has built a multi-faceted career spanning architectural practice, marketing and journalism. His work ranges from residential renovations to urban design proposals, to most recently marketing and communications. He maintains an architectural license in New York.

Images for this article were kindly provided by Andrea Vasquez.

Systems to Incorporate Natural Lighting in Your Projects

18 June, 2018 - 08:00

There is nothing more rational than taking advantage of natural lighting as a guarantee to improve the spatial quality of buildings, as well as saving energy. The awareness of the finitude of natural resources and the demands for reducing energy consumption has increasingly diminished the prominence of artificial lighting systems, forcing architects to seek more efficient design solutions. With this goal in mind, different operations have been adopted to capture natural light.

These systems can also guarantee excellent spatial properties if projected correctly. Below we have gathered five essential systems for zenithal lighting.

Skylights

© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

Established as horizontal openings strategically positioned on the roofs of buildings, skylights allow the direct entrance of natural light into the internal region of the construction. It commonly receives an application of translucent glass on its upper side, allowing a higher percentage of light into the space. They should be used with care, since they tend to favor the gain of thermal loads in the building, increasing the internal temperature. Therefore, they must be strategically positioned and projected regarding dimensions and sealing materials.

Vila de Carvão Sangdong / Studio suspicion . Image © Ryu In Keun Vila de Carvão Sangdong / Studio suspicion . Image © Ryu In Keun

As an alternative to the upper sealing, they can receive a layer of laminated glass or polycarbonate to allow light to enter indirectly and reduce the light percentage. Being one of the most used zenithal lighting systems, they are recommended for less permanent spaces, such as circulation areas, halls, or bathrooms for example.

In addition, these skylights range in a large number of models and vary in design, dimension, and material, from the traditional opening on the slab to more complex tubular models. 

Sheds

© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

Recurrently used in industrial buildings and warehouses that have metal roofs, this type of lucarnes are configured as devices based on the sawtooth geometry of the roofs, with inclinations strategically arranged to receive a certain amount of light. They are usually positioned in relation to the facade with less sunlight (south in the southern hemisphere and north, in the north), allowing natural light without direct sunlight. In some cases, they also contemplate openings to ventilation.

Hospital Sarah Kubitschek Salvador / João Filgueiras Lima. Image © Nelson Kon Hospital Sarah Kubitschek Salvador / João Filgueiras Lima. Image © Nelson Kon

Its variations in terms of dimensions and inclinations are designed based on the luminous percentage requirement of the interior space, allowing a greater or lesser light input. In this system it is essential to close by glass frames, preventing infiltrations from the rains.

Lanternins

© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

Conformed by openings that protrude in relation to the roof, they can appear as small roofs superimposed on the ridges, creating small glazed projections that receive the entrance of natural light through their two sides.

Light Folds / WY-TO Architects. Image © Svend Andersen Light Folds / WY-TO Architects. Image © Svend Andersen

In addition to the light input, the system allows the continuous renewal of the air if mobile frames are used, allowing constant changes from the assumption that hot air tends to rise.

Domes

© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

Domes provide a more far-reaching lighting effect compared to the previous cases. However, due to the large dimensions assumed, in most cases, they tend to generate large thermal loads inside the buildings. Therefore, they are generally used in short-term spaces, such as circulations, courtyards or central areas.

Panteão Romano. Image © Cortesia de Flickr user lysander07 (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) Panteão Romano. Image © Cortesia de Flickr user lysander07 (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Atriums

© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

As well as skylights, atriums open directly on roofs, in most cases with pyramidal or gabled geometries, built with metal profiles and a glass closure. Contrary to the aforementioned cases, this typology is recommended for buildings with a greater number of floors, allowing the entry of a greater luminosity without generating high thermal loads.

Viviendo con la luz del sol / MOVEDESIGN. Image © Yousuke Harigane Viviendo con la luz del sol / MOVEDESIGN. Image © Yousuke Harigane

Solar Tubes

© Matheus Pereira © Matheus Pereira

As well as skylights, solar tubes can be installed in different types of roofs, flat or inclined. With a variety of lengths and widths, they can be flexible or rigid. The difference is that they carry light through reflections, in spaces and roofs where it is not feasible to install systems such as those above.

Internally the tubes are coated with reflective materials, generating different light intensities as a result of their dimensions and materiality, and presenting an optimal solution for industrial and commercial projects. There are also fiberglass models, marketed especially for projects with short distances between the sky and the slab, as homes or smaller buildings.

Biblioteca Viipuri / Alvar Aalto. Image Cortesia de The Finnish Committee for the Restoration of Viipuri Library Biblioteca Viipuri / Alvar Aalto. Image Cortesia de The Finnish Committee for the Restoration of Viipuri Library

Frida Escobedo's Serpentine Pavilion Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

13 June, 2018 - 16:00
© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Following the opening of the 2018 Serpentine Pavillion this week, designed by Mexican architect Frida Escobedo, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to London. Ghinitoiu’s images, which you can discover below, capture the elemental beauty of Escobedo’s pavilion, defined by a permeable cement tile façade inspired by Mexican celosias.

Fusing elements typical to Mexican architecture with local London references, the pavilion centers on a courtyard enclosed by two rectangular volumes constructed using the characteristic celosia method.

A gallery of Ghinitoiu’s photographs is collated below. You can find out more about the design and development of the 2018 Serpentine Pavilion from our extensive coverage here.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Saint-Gobain Announces Winners of the 14th Edition MultiComfort House Students Contest

13 June, 2018 - 10:00
© Saint-Gobain © Saint-Gobain

Students from South Africa, Belarus, and Germany have been chosen as the winners of the 14th edition MultiComfort House Students Contest, a contest created in 2004 and organized by Saint-Gobain. Entrants were to develop a project based on the principles of the multi-comfort concept, that is, "an optimum indoor environment ensuring the right level of fresh air, thermal, visual and acoustic comfort provided in a sustainable and energy efficient manner," as explained by the organizers.

In close collaboration with the Department of Planning of the Municipality of Dubai and the Dubai Properties Group, Saint-Gobain presented the challenge of designing a cross-cultural community project in the cultural village of Dubai, on the shores of the Al Jaddaf inlet.

Considering Dubai's hot and humid climate, the students had to find a way to reconcile reducing the energy consumption of the refrigeration and ventilation systems without compromising any of the comforts of the inhabitants; while at the same time providing an optimal relationship with the environment.

Regarding the results, Pierre-André de Chalendar, president and CEO of Saint-Gobain, commented that this edition will be remembered for "the high-level quality of the projects submitted by the students. I am always amazed by their innovative spirit to use the Saint-Gobain Multi-Comfort solutions to create better and great living places everywhere."

First Place Vahin Parmananda + Mthokozisi Sibisi / KwaZulu-Natal University, South Africa

 Vahin Parmananda + Mthokozisi Sibisi / KwaZulu-Natal University, South Africa. Image © Saint-Gobain First Place: Vahin Parmananda + Mthokozisi Sibisi / KwaZulu-Natal University, South Africa. Image © Saint-Gobain

Second Place
Veronika Supruniuk / Brest State University, Belarus

 Veronika Supruniuk / Brest State University, Belarus. Image © Saint-Gobain Second Place: Veronika Supruniuk / Brest State University, Belarus. Image © Saint-Gobain

Third Place
Tobias Bretz + Dill Khan / Hochschule Darmstadt, Germany

 Tobias Bretz + Dill Khan / Hochschule Darmstadt, Germany. Image © Saint-Gobain Third Place: Tobias Bretz + Dill Khan / Hochschule Darmstadt, Germany. Image © Saint-Gobain

Additionally, the jury awarded honorable mentions to the team consisting of Alejandra González, Paulino Poveda, and Santiago Rodríguez (Spain), and Joanna Wnuczek (Poland).

"The MultiComfort House Student Contest sheds light on the incredible efforts of a young generation of talented architects who will be key contributors to ensuring that Dubai will enjoy a sustainable environment in line with our leadership vision," said Samira AlRais, Senior Director of Policy and Strategy, Sustainable Development of the General Secretariat of the Executive Council of Dubai.

David Basulto, a member of the jury and founder and CEO of ArchDaily, commented that the contest "provides a unique and strong framework for students to develop their skills, by operating on a real site and dealing with the challenges of comfort on extreme conditions."

50 teams of students from 28 participating countries presented their projects in four presentation sessions before an international jury that included representatives from the Municipality of Dubai, as well as architects and experts.

News vía Saint-Gobain

These Time-Lapses Capture the Construction of the 2022 Qatar World Cup Stadiums

13 June, 2018 - 08:00
via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

As the 2018 World Cup approaches, we architects can already look ahead to the next tournament. The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar offers the most exciting opportunity in stadium design for decades, with the competition relying on an almost entirely new footballing infrastructure. Several world-renowned designers have submitted proposals, and the following set of newly released time-lapse videos show the progression of each stadium, as we approach four years to the competition’s start. Emphasising the structural shells, the videos highlight a sometimes overlooked facet of stadium design. To materialize the effortless magic of the initial renders - like those produced by Foster + Partners and Zaha Hadid Architects - phenomenal levels of engineering and problem solving are required, and in the early stages of construction, this becomes the visual focal point. Read on to see the beauty of these structural marvels, but be warned - you may develop World Cup fever.

Project: Al Bayt Stadium
Location: Al Khor City
Designer: Dar Al-Handasah
Capacity: 60,000

via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

 

Project: Al Wakrah Stadium  
Location: Al Wakrah
Designer: Zaha Hadid Architects
Capacity: 40,000

Courtesy of Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy Courtesy of Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy

 

Project: Al Rayyan Stadium 
Location: Al Rayyan Municipality
Designer: Pattern Architects 
Capacity: 44,740

via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

 

Project: Education City Stadium 
Location:
Education City, Al Rayyan Municipality
Designer: DR. Omar Jamal, SENSI Moe and Sons, Dr. Demonichaos (Wareface CO.)
Capacity: 40,000

via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

 

Project: Al Thumama Stadium  
Location: Doha
Designer: Ibrahim J Aidah  
Capacity: 40,000

via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

 

Project: Lusail Stadium   
Location: Lusail
Designer: Foster + Partners 
Capacity: 86,250

via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

 

Project: Ras Abu Aboud Stadium  
Location: Doha
Designer: Fenwick Iribarren Architects 
Capacity: 40,000

via screenshot from video via screenshot from video

Bee Breeders Announce Winners of the Iceland Northern Lights Rooms Competition

10 June, 2018 - 10:00
Courtesy of Bee Breeders, In-Visible Courtesy of Bee Breeders, In-Visible

Bee Breeders have announced the winners of the Iceland Northern Lights Rooms competition, where entrants were tasked with designing a series of guest houses that framed the beauty of the surrounding context. In response to the delicate landscape, Mývatn Lake in Iceland, the brief outlined a number of restrictions. These included no permanent construction within 200m from the lake, and that all guest houses were to be movable. Shared themes throughout all the successful proposals were specific material experimentation, “distinct interaction with the site and sky,” scalable design, irand cost-conscious solutions.

First Place: In-Visible
Participants: Kamila Szatanowska, Paulina Rogalska

The first placed design ‘In-Visible’ creates “a series of mirror-clad guest houses of varying sizes, movable and distributed about the site”. The main building is covered in peat, a traditional Icelandic construction technique, merging seamlessly into the landscape. Beautifully illustrated, the submission highlights the “design’s care to minimize site disturbance,” while its buildability, innovation, and how it was “well-suited to its location” all impressed the jury.

Courtesy of Bee Breeders, In-Visible Courtesy of Bee Breeders, In-Visible

Second Place: Bleikur
Participants: Francois Bodlet

‘Bleikur’ uses Icelandic corrugated metal cladding in a set of convincing drawings. The submission “adapts this regional cladding type and proposes a series of sail-shaped buildings made of metal and plywood”. Reacting to the weather patterns and color of the sky, the cladding sits comfortably within the context, and the curved forms emphasize the lateral and vertical views of the landscape.

Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Bleikur Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Bleikur

Third Place: Northern Lights
Participants: Catarina Oom de Sousa, Carla Romagosa Girós, Eftalia Proios Torras

Receiving third place, ‘Northern Lights’ “contain(s) an optimized central nucleus where the facilities and private spaces are enclosed, allowing the circulation spaces to open towards the landscape”. The unique lightweight proposal utilized the several advantages of ETFE, the same material used within the Eden Project, to create an extremely sensitive and responsible scheme.

Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Northern Lights Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Northern Lights

Student Prize: Marimo
Participants: Magdalena Pająk (POLITECHNIKA ŚLĄSKA)

The student winner is influenced by the Marimo - a unique plant that floats toward the surface of the lake in order to capture sunlight. Treating the houses similarly to a hot air balloon, the speculative proposal surrounds the guest house in an inflatable structure and has no solid foundations, mimicking the movements of the local plant.

Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Marimo Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Marimo

BB Green Award: Of Crater and Hearth
Participants: Chang Yuan Max Hsu, Hadeel Ayed Mohammad

Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Of crater and hearth Courtesy of Bee Breeders, Of crater and hearth

Winner of the BB Green Award, ‘Of Crater and Hearth’ is set within the landscape to create minimal disruption within the context. The scheme being “conceived from the synthesis between pseudocraters and the traditional Viking longhouse”.

News via: Bee Breeders

Wearable Architecture: 11 Architecture-Inspired Jewelry Lines

10 June, 2018 - 09:45
via Yumi Endo via Yumi Endo

Let’s face it. You can spot a design enthusiast from miles away thanks to his or her remarkably unique style. Whether it’s their one-of-a-kind backpack or customized sneakers, they’ll make sure they turn heads wherever they go. While some love to "go big or go home" with their outfits and accessories, others choose a more subtle approach to their styling. Thankfully, some creative minds have stretched their love of architecture and geometry and developed unique jewelry pieces inspired by their interests.

To all the architects, designers, artists, expressionists, and people outside the design world with really good taste, here’s a list of architecture-inspired jewelry that will undoubtedly stand out. Get those credit cards out because we promise, you won’t be able to resist.

Gravelli

via Gravelli via Gravelli

WALLY / € 272.00, Gravelli

Gravelli designed an entire line of jewelry and accessories made out of concrete and surgical steel. These geometric handmade earrings are one of many pieces designed by the Czech brand which show their creativity in working with the architectural material. 

Ortogonale

via Ortogonale via Ortogonale

Concrete Ring / $ 47.42, Etsy

Brutalism is not only exclusive to buildings. Ortogonale have designed a selection of brutalist jewelry with minimal designs, suitable for all tastes.

Grace and Robot

via Grace and Robot via Grace and Robot

3D Printed Architectural Earrings / $52.65, Etsy

Apparently, trusses are not only for structural support. English jewelry brand Grace and Robot combine architecture, art, and technology, and create jewelry pieces that are entirely 3D printed.

Cut by Yumi Endo

via Yumi Endo via Yumi Endo

Delaunay / $45.00, Yumi Endo

CUT by Yumi Endo is a New York City-based design studio which plays around design and technology. The jewelry line is inspired by architectural details and patterns which are found in New York City and other countries Yumi, the designer, has visited. If you think her accessories are impressive, take a look at how the designer developed her designs from black and white city photographs.

Diego Delgado-Elias

via Diego Delgado-Elias via Diego Delgado-Elias

Talk about multi-functional. Paris-based architect Diego Delgado-Elias has designed a series of silver rings inspired by architectural tools: a set square, a protractor, a level, and an architectural scale. The rings are handcrafted in brushed silver and finished using a combination of 3D printing and laser cutting methods.

Adorn Milk

via Adorn Milk via Adorn Milk

Plisse Bracelet / $70.00, Adorne Milk

Adorn Milk is a specialized jewelry shop for people who love architecture + design. Their pieces are high-quality handmade accessories inspired by structural elements and dynamic patterns, and range from bracelets to earrings, brooches, and hair pieces.

Shekhtwoman

via Shekhtwoman via Shekhtwoman via Shekhtwoman via Shekhtwoman

Cityscape Rings / $99.00, Etsy

Nothing shows your love for a city more than wearing a statement ring that represents its iconic landmarks. North Carolina-based jewelry maker Ola Shekhtman created city-inspired rings with materials ranging from silver, gold, and platinum.

Archetype Z Studio

via Archetype Z Studio via Archetype Z Studio via Archetype Z Studio via Archetype Z Studio

Triangulated Cuff Bracelet / $32.00, Archetype Z Studio

A fan of faceted structures, Alia Hasan, was inspired by the irregularity behind geometric forms and the complexity in which they appear. The triangulated cuff bracelets are 3D printed and are then colored in black dye.

Philippe Tournaire

via Tournaire via Tournaire

New York Architecture Ring / $3,500.00, Tournaire

New York City: a lavish city needs a lavish ring to match it. This gold and diamond ring is a perfect representation of the "concrete jungle" and is quite the statement piece.

Vicki Ambery Smith

via Vicky Ambery Smith via Vicky Ambery Smith

Smith’s designs are ornate small-scale jewelry inspired by real and imaginary buildings throughout the world. Her rings possess striking details of Renaissance and contemporary buildings, transforming them into works of art rather than just jewelry.

Sketchadesign

via Sketchadesign via Sketchadesign

Paris City Necklace / $29.00, Etsy

Sketcha jewelry has created a series of cityscape necklaces for all the architecture and travel lovers. The necklaces can be plated with gold or silver with skylines that vary from Paris, to London, Tokyo, and New York.

Sharjah Architecture Triennial to Open as First Major Platform on Middle Eastern Architecture

9 June, 2018 - 14:00
Central Market, King Faisal Street, Al Itihad Park, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra Central Market, King Faisal Street, Al Itihad Park, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra

The Sharjah Architecture Triennial will open in November 2019 as "the first major platform for dialogue on architecture and urbanism in the Middle East, North Africa, East Africa and South Asia." Curator Adrian Lahoud has announced the theme of the Triennial as the Rights of Future Generations, aiming to fundamentally challenge traditional ideas about architecture and introduce new ways of thinking that veer from current Western-centric discourse.

King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė

“Rights of Future Generations questions how inheritance, legacy, and the state of the environment are passed from one generation to the next, how present decisions have long-term intergenerational consequences, and how other expressions of co-existence, including indigenous ones, might challenge dominant western perspectives. Turning to alternative concepts of architecture and the environment, the Sharjah Architecture Triennial will focus on moments where experiments with architectural and institutional forms collaborate to generate new social realities. Architecture’s power is fundamentally propositional and pedagogical. Design is an opportunity to bring alternative modes of existence into being, including new concepts of what buildings, cities, landscapes, and territories are.” 
-Adrian Lahoud, Curator of Rights of Future Generations

Street view of Bank Street buildings and Al Hisn Fort Museum, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra Street view of Bank Street buildings and Al Hisn Fort Museum, Sharjah. Image © Paul Gorra

The Triennial will be held in the Emirate of Sharjah, its history as a multi-ethnic trade port contributes to its layered architectural landscape where historic and contemporary buildings co-exist. This makes it a fitting and rich site for this inaugural Triennial, which will run for three months, each edition led by a curator who will direct a core program of exhibitions, urban interventions, conferences, and public talks.

King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987.Aerial view of a Bank Street urban fragment. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė King Faisal Mosque, King Abdul Aziz Street, Sharjah, Office of Technical & Architectural Engineering & Consultancy, 1987.Aerial view of a Bank Street urban fragment. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė

The unique circumstances of practicing as an architect, artist, or scholar in the MENASA region motivated the Triennial theme of Rights of Future Generations. Faced with non-existent or fragmented archives, restrictions on travel, and the lack of institutional support, the Sharjah Triennial attempts to initiate region-specific dialogue and lay the groundwork of an enduring resource for future generations of architects.

Northwest view of Bank Street buildings, Bank Street, Sharjah, Architects Tecnica y Proyectos (TYPSA), 1977. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė Northwest view of Bank Street buildings, Bank Street, Sharjah, Architects Tecnica y Proyectos (TYPSA), 1977. Image © Ieva Saudargaitė Adrian Lahoud, Curator of the Sharjah Architecture Triennial. Image © Rabee Younes Adrian Lahoud, Curator of the Sharjah Architecture Triennial. Image © Rabee Younes

News via: Sharjah Architecture Triennial

The Role of Color in Architecture: Visual Effects and Psychological Stimuli

9 June, 2018 - 10:00
Escola em Alto de Pinheiros / Base Urbana + Pessoa Arquitetos. Image © Pedro Vanucchi Escola em Alto de Pinheiros / Base Urbana + Pessoa Arquitetos. Image © Pedro Vanucchi

Colors and their perceptions are responsible for a series of conscious and subconscious stimuli in our psycho-spatial relationship. Despite its presence and its variations, it is present in all places. Have you ever wondered what its role is in architecture?

As well as the constructive elements that make up an architectural object, the application of colors on surfaces also influences the user's experience of the space. According to Israel Pedrosa, "a colorful sensation is produced by the nuances of light refracted or reflected by a material, commonly the word color is designated to those shades that function as stimuli in a chromatic sensation." [1]

Flickr Pov Stele. Licença CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageCasa Gilardi / Luis Barragán Flickr Pov Stele. Licença CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageCasa Gilardi / Luis Barragán

Describing the relationship of colors and the different features that govern them, or even the multitude of existing studies regarding these theories, is as complex as it is extensive. Color can be associated with psychology, symbolism and even mysticism; colors take on different meanings according to the artistic, historical or the cultural period; colors change when facing light; among many other characteristics. This article is not intended to address technical aspects of color or concepts studied by critics. However, it does seek to ponder the relationship between color and architecture.

Let's take a look at some well-known names from the history of architecture. Regarding the work of Luis Barragán, color demonstrates spatial purity as an element that evokes emotions, while Siza Vieira adheres to the achromatism of surfaces. Meanwhile, Lina Bo Bardi uses red in some architectural elements, and Legorreta adopts exuberant colors, which are inspired by Mexican culture.

Hotel Camino Real de Polanco / Ricardo Legorreta. Image © Flickr kieranmcglone Hotel Camino Real de Polanco / Ricardo Legorreta. Image © Flickr kieranmcglone

Color can show a certain volume or constructive detail, or visually mimic certain aspects of space. It can also provide a set of emotions or visual effects.

Flickr Pov Stele. Licença CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageCasa Gilardi / Luis Barragán Flickr Pov Stele. Licença CC BY-SA 2.0. ImageCasa Gilardi / Luis Barragán

If we create an environment with walls, floors, and neutral ceilings, when we apply certain colors on the different surfaces, we get different visual effects. For example, if we apply a darker shade on the ceiling, the sensation of a lower space is generated; if we apply color to the central wall of space, the idea of a certain "spatial shortening" is created visually; whereas, if it is applied to all walls, the perception of a space longer than it really is, is produced.

If only the lateral walls of the space are painted, there is a noted perception of narrowing; otherwise, when painting the central wall and ceiling in the same hue, the environment seems to expand. If you are looking to lower the height of the space or put the focus at the height of the observer's gaze, then painting all the surfaces at half height, and putting the darker tones on the upper surfaces gives us this desired effect.

But colors do not exist without the presence of light. As Israel Pedrosa says in his book Da Cor à Cor Inexistente, "color has no material existence: it is only the sensation produced by certain nervous organizations under the action of light, with more precision, the action provoked by the action of the light on the organ of vision." [2] Color is intimately linked to psychological stimuli and can be used in conjunction with volume and the shape of each project.

Prestwood Infant School Dining Hall / De Rosee Sa. Image Cortesia de De Rosee Sa Prestwood Infant School Dining Hall / De Rosee Sa. Image Cortesia de De Rosee Sa

Regarding the "psychology" of the main colors, the following ideas have been developed:

Blue: Transmits the feeling of positivity, confidence, and security. It is often used in commercial and business spaces, such as banking agencies, offices and companies.
Yellow: Portrays optimism, curiosity, joviality and a bright atmosphere. It is frequently used in commercial spaces or restaurants to gain the attention of pedestrians.
Red: This color shows energy, excitement, impulse. Therefore, it is regularly used in commercial spaces, such as stores or fast food outlets, as it portrays a certain compulsivity and consumer desire.
Green: Evokes calm, tranquility, serenity and well-being. It is regularly used in spaces associated with health and well-being, such as hospitals and relaxation centers.
Orange: The result of the combination of yellow and red, orange projects an idea of intensity, creativity, euphoria, and enthusiasm. It is often used in creative environments, such as offices, studios, and schools. If used together with blue, it conveys the idea of impulsivity and trust, and so is adopted by banking agencies and offices.
Violet: It transmits well-being, calmness, and softness.

Prestwood Infant School Dining Hall / De Rosee Sa. Image Cortesia de De Rosee Sa Prestwood Infant School Dining Hall / De Rosee Sa. Image Cortesia de De Rosee Sa

In children's projects, colors are used to motivate the child's psychological and sensory development. Among innumerable examples, the following are standouts: the College in Alto de Pinheiros of the architects of Base Urbana + Pessoa Arquitetos; the Prestwood Elementary School of De Rosee Sa; and the 'Els Colors' kindergarten by RCR Arquitectes.

In hospital projects or the field of health, colors are used as a complementary element for the rehabilitation of patients, such as in the Esther Koplowitz Foundation for Patients with Cerebral Palsy, designed by Hans Abaton, and the Nemours Children's Hospital, which is designed by Stanley Beaman & Sears.

Fundação Esther Koplowitz para Pacientes com Paralisia Cerebral / Hans Abaton. Image © Hans Abaton Fundação Esther Koplowitz para Pacientes com Paralisia Cerebral / Hans Abaton. Image © Hans Abaton

In urban projects, colors are sometimes used to restore liveliness and to renovate deteriorated spaces, such as the intervention of the Kampung Pelangi village, in Indonesia, and the Superkilen park of the Danish firm BIG, which uses a significant amount of color to give a "spatial identity."

Superkilen / BIG. Image © Dragor Luft Superkilen / BIG. Image © Dragor Luft

Color is an integral element in architecture; it is not only important aesthetically, but it also has a great psycho-sensory importance. Use it wisely in your projects!

Footnotes:
[1] (PEDROSA, p.98, 2009)
[2] (PEDROSA, p.20, 2009)

Bibliographic References
PEDROSA, Israel. Da Cor à Cor Inexistente. São Paulo: Senac, 2009.

Rainbow Road: Light Painting Blazes a Trail Through Forests, Cities & the Sea

8 June, 2018 - 19:00
[ By SA Rogers in Art & Photography & Video. ]

Surreal and at times a bit eerie, a rainbow road made of pure light winds through muted landscapes as if illuminating a path to another world. As it makes its way through snowy forests, across rocky creeks and along the seashore before pausing within an abandoned shed, it almost seems alive. For filmmaker and photographer Daniel Mercadante, there’s a sense of hope to it, a narrative that only becomes apparent when you see all of the images in the series on his Instagram. “When the journey felt long and lonely, can you remember you’re on the Rainbow Road?”

The rainbow first appears in a dark and mysterious forest. It travels throughout the many diverse landscapes of California, skips all the way down to the lush jungles and weathered alleyways of Guatemala, reappears briefly on the West Coast and then finds its way to Connecticut before encircling Mercadante’s wife and creative partner, Katina Mercadante, in celebration of their anniversary.

The project is a gorgeous example of just how magical long-exposure photography can be. It’s so simple to make – you just wave sources of light against a darkened backdrop while keeping the camera shutter open longer than usual – yet it seems to open a portal to another universe. Check out the Mercadantes’ Instagram to see the whole journey, or their website for their collaborative film projects.

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[ By SA Rogers in Art & Photography & Video. ]

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Photographs Capture Frida Escobedo's 2018 Serpentine Pavilion Nearing Completion

8 June, 2018 - 14:00
© Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo

Photographer Francesco Russo has captured the construction of Frida Escobedo’s 2018 Serpentine Pavilion, as the structure nears completion in London’s Hyde Park. The images showcase the dark cement roof tiles used to construct the pavilion, which comprises an enclosed courtyard created by two rectangular volumes.

With an interplay of light and water, the pavilion seeks to evoke the sensation of the domestic architecture of Mexico, from where Escobedo hails. The stacked cement tiled visible in the photographs form a "celosia," a type of permeable wall common in Mexico.

© Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo

Escobedo is the youngest architect to have participated in the Serpentine Pavilion program since its beginning in 2000, and is known for her work in activating public spaces. Her design for the 2018 Serpentine Pavilion is noted for its marriage of traditional Mexican architecture and the use of British materials with references to its London context.

© Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo

The pavilion’s courtyard will feature a triangular pool, with the underside of the structure’s roof featuring mirrored panels, hence creating a pair of reflective surfaces which respond to the changing position of the sun. In reference to the pavilion’s intent as a “timepiece,” the scheme is arranged on a north-south axis, evoking the Prime Meridian located a few miles to the east in Greenwich.

© Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo

Escobedo’s piece follows on from previous Serpentine Pavilions by Diébédo Francis Kéré in 2017 and BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group in 2016. The Pavilion will open on June 15th.

© Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo © Francesco Russo

Photographs by: Francesco Russo

Cast-in-Place Innovation: The World’s First 3D-Printed Concrete Houses

7 June, 2018 - 19:00
[ By WebUrbanist in Architecture & Houses & Residential. ]

A series of elaborately curved houses designed for Eindhoven will rest like large boulders in the Dutch landscape, illustrating the complex forms made possible by new and evolving 3D-printing technologies.

The first single-story house will be around 1,000 square feet and allow for process refinements for the multi-story units to follow – research and innovation are part of the mandate of the Eindhoven University of Technology and other project partners.

The goal, in part, is to optimize for quality, comfort and cost, with each phase building on the previous iteration, a marriage of experimentation and architectural creation.

Construction will begin this year and the first unit should be occupiable sometime next year. While the ideas are bigger than creating a single small neighborhood of homes, having them be functional in the end is also a key aim of the project.

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[ By WebUrbanist in Architecture & Houses & Residential. ]

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Pelli Clarke Pelli Details Competition-Winning Proposal for the Chengdu Natural History Museum

7 June, 2018 - 14:00
Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects has won an international contest for the Chengdu Natural History Museum in China, seeing off competition from firms such as Zaha Hadid Architects and FUKSAS. With a form inspired by the geological impact of shifting tectonic plates, and reflecting pools inspired by ancient irrigation systems, the scheme makes heavy reference to the surrounding natural landscape, while dominant features such as a tall central atrium form a visual connection with the built environment. Below, the architects offer their own description of the winning scheme. 

Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Text description provided by the architects. World-renowned architecture firm Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, in collaboration with China Southwest Architectural Design and Research Institute Corp. Ltd. (CSWADI), has won an international design competition for the Chengdu Natural History Museum in Chengdu, China. Other competitors in the competition included Zaha Hadid Architects, Sutherland Hussey Harris, Nihon Sekkei, Valode & Pistre, and FUKSAS.

Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

The site is located in the eastern part of the historical and culturally rich city of Chengdu, China. The 62,700-square-meter / 674,897-square-foot museum will include innovative exhibition and educational spaces, permanent, temporary and interactive exhibits, a gift shop, a café, cinemas, and outdoor spaces. The building will be an important cultural landmark for the city of Chengdu, which is in the midst of an economic boom as a new high-tech and entrepreneurial hub.

Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects’ winning design was inspired by the natural geological forms found in the Sichuan Basin. Over time, volcanic activity and shifting tectonic plate movements created horizontal and vertical forces, causing the uplift of the plateau.  These forces created forms that are unique to the natural environment of Chengdu. The ancient Shu water irrigation system is the inspiration into the outdoor space as reflecting pools and tributaries that frame the museum.

Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

The central atrium is a tall and generous space filled with natural light. It visually connects the city, street and the main entrance to the museum landscape and the adjacent water irrigation system. The atrium will be the vibrant heart of the building, crossed by sky bridges and connecting to exhibits and public amenity spaces.

Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

One member of the Expert Jury Panel remarked, “The greatest feature of this design is that it managed to maintain a vertical visual impression of the building while the human-scale experience of it is in a horizontal way. The scheme integrates architecture, landscape and the surrounding environment well.”

Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

“Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects is honored to have won this international competition,” said Senior Design Principal Fred Clarke, FAIA, RIBA, JIA. Associate Principal Kristin Hawkins, AIA, added, “ We look forward to a strong partnership with our client and CSWADI toward creating a building that embodies the uniqueness of the city of Chengdu and the mission of this important cultural institution within the community.”

The Chengdu Natural History Museum is currently scheduled for completion in 2021.

News via Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects.

11 Must-See Exhibitions at the 2018 Venice Biennale

7 June, 2018 - 09:00
Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia Courtesy of la Biennale di Venezia

As always, this year’s edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale is brimming with exhibitions and installations—the result of thousands upon thousands of hours of research and work. When arriving at the Arsenale or Giardini, the overwhelming amount of "things to see" are neatly tucked into the national pavilions, or, in the case of the Arsenale, hidden on the sides of the sweeping corridor. In the likely event that you have limited time to enjoy all that FREESPACE has to offer, ArchDaily's editors have selected our favorite works displayed at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition.

Here, presented in no particular order, are some of our top suggestions from across the Biennale sites.

Showing the Unknowns of The Familiar Space

Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour 

Exhibitors: Alessandro Bosshard, Li Tavor, Matthew van der Ploeg, Ani Vihervaara
Giardini

Manipulating the spatial scale, this pavilion forces visitors to re-examine their perception of architectural elements, intelligently overwhelming the designer's consciousness and their responsibility when configuring a domestic space. This unfurnished interior—or Freespace—puts aside the functional performance of the space and leaves in evidence only architectural design. By raising relevant issues in a playful environment, the pavilion received the Golden Lion for the Best National Participation.

Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour . Image © Italo Rondinella Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour . Image © Italo Rondinella Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour . Image © Italo Rondinella Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour . Image © Italo Rondinella Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour . Image © Italo Rondinella Switzerland / Svizzera 240 - House Tour . Image © Italo Rondinella

From Deathstrip to Freespace

Germany / Unbuilding Walls

Curator: Marianne Birthler, Lars Krückeberg, Wolfram Putz, Thomas Willemeit
Giardini

Decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the footprint of what divided East and West remains as one of the spaces with the biggest potential. Curated by GRAFT, "Unbuilding Walls, From Deathstrip to Freespace" features projects such as the unrealized ideas of Rem Koolhaas for Checkpoint Charlie, to the distribution of techno cathedrals along the wall, to the new Axel Springer HQ, together with several formal and grassroots projects that have seized the Freespace potential of the strip that represented freedom, prison, death, and rebirth.

Germany / Unbuilding Walls. Image © Jan Bitter Germany / Unbuilding Walls. Image © Jan Bitter Germany / Unbuilding Walls. Image © Jan Bitter Germany / Unbuilding Walls. Image © Jan Bitter Germany / Unbuilding Walls. Image © Jan Bitter Germany / Unbuilding Walls. Image © Jan Bitter

Transmuting a Barrier into a Territory

Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) - Stand Ground
Arsenale

Part of the International Exhibition of the event, Rozana Montiel's installation stands out for virtually tearing down one of the walls of the Arsenale to "open" the closed space of the building to the streets of Venice. Visitors can not only walk and inhabit the wall—faithfully reconstructed in a horizontal position—but also can sense its weight and its construction method, as a section. As a result, this installation is a simple but powerful operation with a high symbolic content.

Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) / Stand Ground. Image © Andrea Avezzù Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) / Stand Ground. Image © Andrea Avezzù Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) / Stand Ground. Image © Andrea Avezzù Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) / Stand Ground. Image © Andrea Avezzù Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) / Stand Ground. Image © Andrea Avezzù Rozana Montiel Estudio de Arquitectura (México) / Stand Ground. Image © Andrea Avezzù

The Scale of The Individual 

Michael Maltzan Architecture (USA) - Star Apartments
Giardini - Central Pavilion

This exhibition is a direct proposal—in form and content—that questions the visitor and makes them think about their own relationship to Freespace through their everyday environment; to what extent does the architecture we inhabit give us the freedom to shape our personal spaces? Michael Maltzan analyzes the "Star Apartments" social housing project in Los Angeles and presents the rich diversity of its interior spaces, containing designs by its own residents.

Michael Maltzan Architectire (USA). Image © José Tomás Franco Michael Maltzan Architectire (USA). Image © José Tomás Franco Michael Maltzan Architectire (USA). Image © Italo Rondinella Michael Maltzan Architectire (USA). Image © Italo Rondinella Michael Maltzan Architectire (USA). Image © Italo Rondinella Michael Maltzan Architectire (USA). Image © Italo Rondinella

Freespace As a Blank Canvas for Architecture

Holy See / Vatican Chapels

Curators: Francesco Dal Co, Micol Forti
Venezia Centro Storico

Ten architects were invited to design ten chapels in the middle of the forest on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore. The challenge posed, in itself, refers to Freespace in a largely disciplinary sense: How does one design a building with a very specific function in an abstract territory, without destinations or strong points of reference? The island is transformed into a blank sheet for the deployment of the architecture; one of the most difficult challenges we can receive. How did these architects solve it?

Vatican Chapels / Javier Corvalan. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Vatican Chapels / Javier Corvalan. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Vatican Chapels / Flores&Prats. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Vatican Chapels / Flores&Prats. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Vatican Chapels / Smiljan Radic. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Vatican Chapels / Smiljan Radic. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Projects as Open Processes

France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?

Curators: Nicola Delon, Julien Choppin, Sébastien Eymard- Encore Heureux
Arsenale

Curated by French Architects Encore Heureux, "Infinite Places" displays 10 projects that generate unexpected outcomes. Rather than just talking about buildings, each case is presented as a unique and engaging timeline with fascinating stories about the complex lives of the projects—including transformations from abandonment and neglect into active community spaces. The selected projects are not presented as examples to follow strictly, but rather as processes that can be applied to the potential of unused places. Highly connected to the curatorial theme of Freespace, the French pavilion shines a light on the power of the vision of communities, architects, and governments. The exhibit makes great use of architectural models which, paired with embedded screens, effectively display how the buildings are being used today.

Bonus: Visitors can share their own "Infinite Places," highlighting the global potential of unused spaces, waiting to be reclaimed to take advantage of for their infinite condition.

France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?. Image © Italo Rondinella France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?. Image © Italo Rondinella France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?. Image © Italo Rondinella France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?. Image © Italo Rondinella France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?. Image © Italo Rondinella France / Infinite Places - Building or Making Places?. Image © Italo Rondinella

Confining The Entire Horizon Into a Glass Box

Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo

Curators/Exhibitors: Javier Mendiondo, Pablo Anzilutti, Franciso Garrido, Federico Cairoli
Arsenale

This installation transports us to the vastness of the Argentinian Pampas through a container that reflects in its walls a series of projects relevant to local architecture, presented through their initial sketches. The proposal is formally attractive and suggestive, opening the concept of Freespace to the visitor to think about their own interpretations: Are we correctly occupying the Freespace we receive in each assignment? Is it necessary to continue building? How do we improve the preexisting through each new project we build?

Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo. Image © Federico Cairoli Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo. Image © Federico Cairoli Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo. Image © Federico Cairoli Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo. Image © Federico Cairoli Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo. Image © Federico Cairoli Argentina / Horizontal Vertigo. Image © Federico Cairoli

Exploring a Nation's Psyche Through Metaphor

Great Britain / Island

Curators: Caruso St John Architects, Marcus Taylor
Giardini

In principle, an empty pavilion surrounded by scaffolding might not sound like a must-see. But the British Pavilion is an excellent example of a "show, don't tell" response to the Biennale theme of generosity, offering out its spaces to other countries for events and providing impressive views of the Venetian lagoon from its rooftop plaza. Much has been made of the metaphorical implications of the pavilion and its connection to the "identity crisis" of Brexit. However the pavilion's related publication, containing among other things a copy of Shakespeare's The Tempest and a series of works by the aptly named poet Kate Tempest, shows how the "Island" mentality explored by Caruso St John and Marcus Taylor has underpinned the British psyche for much longer; like the pavilion itself, the book is worth your time.

Great Britain / Island. Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain / Island. Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain / Island. Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain / Island. Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain / Island. Image © Italo Rondinella Great Britain / Island. Image © Italo Rondinella

Questioning the Biennial Manifesto From Illegitimate Spaces

Cruising Pavilion

Curators: Pierre-Alexandre Mateos, Rasmus Myrup, Octave Perrault, Charles Teyssou 
Spazio Punch, Giudecca

On another shore, on the island of Giudecca, a group of architects, artists, critics, and curators, have formed a space that seeks to review the concept on Freespace of the Venice Biennale 2018: How can we talk about Freespace without considering all those illegitimate, invisible spaces in our cities? The Cruising Pavilion declares this manifesto as failed if it "doesn't question the heteronormative production of space itself," submerging us in the atmosphere of the alleys, bathhouses, and sex clubs which differ greatly from those spaces officially presented by the event. 

Cruising Pavilion. Image © Louis De Belle Cruising Pavilion. Image © Louis De Belle Cruising Pavilion. Image © Louis De Belle Cruising Pavilion. Image © Louis De Belle Cruising Pavilion. Image © Louis De Belle Cruising Pavilion. Image © Louis De Belle

A Futuristic Approach to the Countryside

Cloud Village / Archi-Union Architects

Principal Architect: Philip F. Yuan (China)
Arsenale

Responding to the Chinese Pavilion's theme "Building a Future Countryside," Philip Yuan's Cloud Village installation pulls together a number of conceptual threads to create a compelling structure. Using recycled plastic, a (surprisingly sturdy) lattice structure has been 3D printed in Shanghai and shipped in pieces to Venice for assembly. The installation is compelling on its own—the 3D printed plastic is worth seeing up close for those who haven't seen this system of construction before—but the implications for rural Chinese life are also intriguing, showing how the countryside can use the absolute cutting edge of technology just as effectively as the city.

Cloud Village / Philip F. Yuan. Image © Liming Zhang Cloud Village / Philip F. Yuan. Image © Liming Zhang Cloud Village / Philip F. Yuan. Image © Liming Zhang Cloud Village / Philip F. Yuan. Image © Liming Zhang Cloud Village / Philip F. Yuan. Image © Liming Zhang Cloud Village / Philip F. Yuan. Image © Liming Zhang

Life Obviously Exceeds Architecture

Japan / Architectural Ethnography

Curators: Momoyo Kaijima with Laurent Stalder and Yu Iseki
Giardini

"Life obviously exceeds architecture." With this strong phrase, curator Momoyo Kaijima sets the tone of the exhibit which, through 42 projects from all over the world represented by fantastic highly detailed drawings, aims to bring a dimension of life to architecture. A reminder of Atelier Bow-Wow’s Pet Architecture book, that set a precedent on how architectural drawings could incorporate the dimension of daily life, the exhibit displays sections, sketches, hand drawings, and axonometrics that can be explored by using a series of devices available throughout the exhibit.

Japan / Architectural Ethnography. Image © Italo Rondinella Japan / Architectural Ethnography. Image © Italo Rondinella Japan / Architectural Ethnography. Image © Italo Rondinella Japan / Architectural Ethnography. Image © Italo Rondinella Japan / Architectural Ethnography. Image © Italo Rondinella Japan / Architectural Ethnography. Image © Italo Rondinella

Morphosis Releases Images of Proposed Orange County Museum of Art in California

1 June, 2018 - 11:25
Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis

Morphosis has released images of its proposed Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) in California. The scheme hopes to create an “open and engaging urban presence within Orange County’s largest center for arts and culture” when it opens in 2021.

At 52,000 square feet, the museum will allow OCMA to organize major temporary exhibitions alongside spacious installations. The museum will contain nearly 25,000 square feet of exhibition galleries, representing a 50% increase on their current location in Newport Beach.

Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis

Morphosis’ design centers on flexibility and functionality, with a reconfigurable main exhibition space flanked by mezzanine and street-front galleries. Exhibition spaces are complimented by an expansive roof terrace, capable of hosting installations, sculpture gardens, or outdoor screenings.

Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis

Morphosis’ design for the museum evolved from both the ‘outside-in’ and the ‘inside-out. The building is a final puzzle piece for the campus at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, responding to the form of the neighboring buildings and energizing the plaza with a café and engaging public spaces. At the same time, the design also responds to a desire to enhance access to OCMA’s permanent collection through neutral, flexible exhibition spaces that can complement art of all media.
-Thom Mayne, Morphosis

Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis

Alongside its exhibition function, the museum will contain 10,000 square feet dedicated to education programs, performances, public gatherings, administration, and a café. “Hovering” above the lobby atrium, a dramatic performance and education space is illuminated by a full-height window overlooking the outdoor terrace.

Courtesy of Morphosis Courtesy of Morphosis

Meanwhile, on the exterior, a grand public stair links the museum to the Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ Argyros Plaza and nearby performance venues. The scheme is offered a distinctive character by light-colored, undulating bands of metal paneling and exposed concrete.

News via: Morphosis

AQSO Arquitectos Design a New, Twisted Landmark For London's Creative Heart

1 June, 2018 - 10:00
Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos

Found at the junction of two famous roads, the Shoreditch Hotel reacts with its unique context in a striking, ship-like form that preserves, and creates, public space for the surrounding area. Designed by AQSO Arquitectos, the proposed scheme includes a hotel at its front, while a cinema and various retail outlets are separated by a public atrium at its rear. The mixed-use facility “explores a formal response to the site conditions with an alternative contemporary language," the resultant blending of perspectives creating a  gateway to London's creative heart. 

Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos

Emphasising the cycling and pedestrian flow, the facade steps back at ground level; a pointed overhang enhancing the angle of the junction to passersby. The contortion of the form aspires to create a project that is “iconic, but not monumental," and as the height gradually decreases along its side, the landmark takes on a much more subtle appearance in the adjacent streets.

Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos

The proposal features regular ‘checkerboard’ external openings, which speak somewhat to the surrounding context, but more importantly generate a rational structural and internal layout. This allows for an economical distribution of rooms throughout the facility and simplifies the complex, twisted facades.

Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos

The interior courtyard that splits the building is both “discrete and enigmatic” - its function not only to allow light to flood into the space, but also to enable the project to become an alternative access point and thoroughfare for the city, enriching the unique urban fabric that surrounds it.

Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos Courtesy of AQSO Arquitectos

News via: AQSO Arquitectos.

Winners of 2018 VEX Competition Reimagine Vernacular Architecture and Design

1 June, 2018 - 08:00

The Association of Siamese Architects (ASA) has announced the winners of the 2018 VEX: Agitated Vernacular Competition. This year’s ASA International Design Competition aimed to "upend the typical associations of vernacular architecture and design," what vernacular should or should not be. The goal was to re-think vernacular as something that can "assume performative roles and possess generative potentials." 

The winning designs challenge the notion that vernacular design is opposed to modernity, thus it is "static and unimprovable," and opposed to technology. Selected from over 230 applications from nearly 30 countries worldwide, the six winning projects are from The Netherlands, India, ChinaPoland, and Thailand.

First Prize

Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, The Netherlands

 Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, Netherlands. Image via Association of Siamese Architects First Prize: Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, Netherlands. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

From the architects:
Vernacular building - once passed on from generation to generation - will lose its cultural use and meaning. Architecture - an invention of the metropolis - will be all that survives. This project accepts this fate and proposes to salvage vernacular building through the only system of thought still possible. It rethinks vernacular building through the logic of its metropolitan antagonist - Architecture.

 Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, Netherlands. Image via Association of Siamese Architects First Prize: Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, Netherlands. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Through the assemblage of Mies van der Rohe's seminal work and a selection of vernacular buildings from all over the world new dialectical images emerge. This in turn can infuse architecture with new possibilities and horizons for an urban future. The wind catchers and Yakhchal added to the Neue Nationalgalerie provide a cool draft and finally resolves the paradox of freedom underlying its plan. The set back Tibetan slate walls of the Lake Shore Drive apartments function as a trombe wall and provides a placebo for the yearn for enclosure and identity. The inserted Sumba Rumah Adat in the Farnsworth House provides shelter from the oppressive heat and enables to slouch in the shade. Whereas the mid-west sheds turn the sublime negative space of Lafayette into a productive landscape fulfilling its promise of urban arcadia.

 Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, Netherlands. Image via Association of Siamese Architects First Prize: Progress, Death, Assemblage and Life - Michael Daane Bolier and Dorus Meurs, Netherlands. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Second Prize

Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India

 Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Second Prize: Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

From the architects:
Indian Railways, which had a modest beginning in 1853, has since been an integral part of the nation - a network of 121,407 kilometers and 7,349 stations that have held together with a population of one billion. A self-propelled social welfare system that has become the lifeline of a nation, Indian Railways has woven a sub-continent together and brought to life the concept of a united India. Given its strength to connect people and resources, what if this modern marvel could carry the very soul of India across its land?

 Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Second Prize: Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Loca(l)motive is an attempt to understand the primary questions of what is local and what is modern. With a vast expanse of local wisdom and resources in the Indian Subcontinent, the idea explores ways of not immortalizing vernacular and making it inaccessible, but rather putting it into use.

 Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Second Prize: Loca(l)motive - Vignesh Harikrishnan, India. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Loca(l)motive also connects the masons of Auroville to the Potters of Dharavi, Mumbai, to help reconstruct the school of Sri Lankan refugees in Chennai through a medium that is not static for vernacular architecture, but rather a lab that runs, settles, learns, shares craft, builds and honks.

Third Prize

Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China

 Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Third Prize: Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

From the architects:
The dome is the main instigator of the design, but it is freed from its original function, context and iconographic definition. Different from the monumental scale and serenity of classical models of the dome, here the dome acts at a human-scale, creating vernacular and scattered individual living units. The mixed play between the traditional and contemporary use of domes gives possibilities associated with architectural history and context, while also setting it free as a typology apart from any of these. It is how we use architectural history to create something new, conceive flexibility as a typological enigma, or to say, achieve spectacular through vernacular.

 Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Third Prize: Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects  Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Third Prize: Vernacular Spectacular - Zhifei Xu and Anthony Lam, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

3 Honorable Mentions

Urban Memory Parasite - Fanbo Zeng, Nan Jiang, Jianhua Lei and Xianhui Bu, China

 Urban Memory Parasite - Fanbo Zeng, Nan Jiang, Jianhua Lei and Xianhui Bu, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Urban Memory Parasite - Fanbo Zeng, Nan Jiang, Jianhua Lei and Xianhui Bu, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

From the architects:
The design expresses the continuation and innovation of the two aspects of vernacular architecture. First, the spatial form. We believe that every kind of vernacular architecture has its own unique spatial form, so the inheritance of it can bring to people the memories and the imagination of the original buildings. Second, the structure. The structural integration with the modern architecture is a way to create new possibilities for vernacular architecture, thus realizing the evolution and transformation of vernacular architecture itself.

In our design, we have chosen several kinds of spatial form of vernacular architecture as shared units and put them into high-density cities. Based on their own characteristics, these units continue to develop new functions. The space functions inside may differ from the original building, but the adaptability to climate, the sustainability, the locality of material, and the cultural spirit are all inherited. The exterior structure continues the original form of the roofs and walls of the vernacular architecture to support the new modern functional spaces, which goes out of the "box" and gives "breathe spaces" to the future cities.

 Urban Memory Parasite - Fanbo Zeng, Nan Jiang, Jianhua Lei and Xianhui Bu, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Urban Memory Parasite - Fanbo Zeng, Nan Jiang, Jianhua Lei and Xianhui Bu, China. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland

 Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

From the architects:
We should re-discuss vernacularism, especially in cities. Our habitat now is much different than before. Most people live in the surroundings that are not natural. In the past architecture was a result of needs. It was born in context, raised by local people. Today so-called vernacular buildings are in fact false. Building timber cottages in the metropolis won’t be vernacular because the context is no longer a forest.

 Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

In cities, there is a lot of waste of transient industries and urban trash. Unused machines, buildings and roads that have changed routes, as well as structures that have lost functions. These elements are part of the modern landscape. Reusing them can make cities different, give them identity and create traditions. It is already happening today in architecture made not by architects, when the economic situation makes them used waste for the city. We are talking about slums that formally are surprisingly similar to vernacular homes of ancient peoples.

We need to stop constant production. Not everything should be new and shiny - every element that we put in our environment stays. Today’s vernacular has a new mission that it didn’t have before. It should no longer derive from natural surroundings because eventually, it will destroy nature. It should heal the environment instead. Make the forest grow again.

 Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Make the Forest Grow Again - Marta Lata, Dobrochna Lata, Agata Czechowska and Mateusz Pietryga, Poland. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand

 Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

From the architects:
In Thailand, there is a beautiful ritual that happens once a year called Loy Kratong. On the full moon of November when the ritual is performed, people set off "kratong", a decorated floating banana stem, making a wish as they do so. Due to the rapid growth of population, the kratong in just Bangkok number over 800,000 pieces, which severely harms the environment.

 Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

In this project, Loy Kratong is reinterpreted and located at Victory Monument, Bangkok. The reinvented kratong is made of clay and embedded with plant seeds. The kratong eventually erodes and after a few days, the water eventually evaporates, and seeds sprout. The ritual space of the Victory Monument becomes a green space.

The architectural design changes the effects created by the kratong by taking benefits of tradition to create interactive architecture. It serves as architecture for Loy Kratong that can be considered as a new vernacular of this region. It reflects the tropical climate, traditional Thai architecture and a new strategy for a modular system.

 Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand. Image via Association of Siamese Architects Honorable Mention: Loy Kratong Revival - Vitchapol Taerattanachai, Thailand. Image via Association of Siamese Architects

Project descriptions and News via: Association of Siamese Architects.

Spotlight: Norman Foster

1 June, 2018 - 06:00
Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Foster's architecture is remarkably diverse; he has designed skyscrapers, offices, galleries, airports, stadiums, parliament buildings, city masterplans and even a spaceport. Yet his work is unified by one theme, identified in the jury citation for his 1999 Pritzker Prize: "from his very first projects, it was evident that he would embrace the most advanced technology appropriate to the task." It is this devotion to the latest architectural technology that earned him his place in the High-Tech movement, with buildings such as the Willis Faber & Dumas headquarters and the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts.

Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank. Image © Wikimedia user WiNG licensed under CC BY 3.0 Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank. Image © Wikimedia user WiNG licensed under CC BY 3.0

Though High-Tech has now largely faded as a "movement," instead being assimilated into multiple other strands of mainstream architecture, Foster's work continues to push the boundaries of architectural technology, earning him commissions such as Apple's futuristic new Cupertino Campus building and one of the world's first purpose-built sustainable "smart cities," Masdar.

Masdar Institute. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners Masdar Institute. Image © Nigel Young / Foster + Partners

Since it was founded in the 1960s, Foster + Partners has been prolific, earning Foster two Stirling Prizes, an RIBA Gold Medal, an AIA Gold Medal and a knighthood in addition to his Pritzker Prize. Designs such as the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, The Gherkin in London, and The Hearst Tower in New York have ensured that Foster has secured his place as one of the greatest architects of the 21st century.

Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi Hearst Tower. Image © Chuck Choi

See all of Norman Foster's (completed) works featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and a selection of further articles below those. A complete list of all our coverage of Foster + Partners' work, including as-yet unbuilt proposals, can be found at this link.

Architecture's Most Inspiring Leaders, Projects & People in 2015

AD Interviews: Norman Foster

Lord Foster receives the Prince of Asturias award

Norman Foster Honored with Louis Kahn Memorial Award

7 Buildings That Show Norman Foster's Architecture Has Always Been Ahead of the Curve

Norman Foster's Advice for the Young: "Find Something You Believe In"

5 Lessons From Norman Foster's Lecture at the Barbican

Norman Foster Explains How Drones in Rwanda Could Lead the Way for New Cities

Norman Foster Stresses the Importance of Interdisciplinary Architecture in Creating Future Cities

Video: Norman Foster Recreates Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion Car

Norman Foster Revisits New York's Hearst Tower With Drones

Norman Foster Discusses the Dawn of High-Tech Architecture in This 1971 Interview

Norman Foster's Interview with The European: "Architecture is the Expression of Values"

VIDEO: Norman Foster on Apple's Cupertino Campus

TED Talk: Norman Foster on Green Architecture

Norman Foster on Urbanism, Emerging Economies and Airport Design

From Productivism to Scenography: The Relighting of Norman Foster's Hongkong and Shanghai Bank

Foster + Partners Declared Largest Practice In The UK

Norman Foster Is 82 And He Instagrams Better Than You Do

LEGO House and Bicycle Snake Honored in 2018 Danish Design Awards

31 May, 2018 - 16:00
© Kim Christensen / DISSING + WEITLING Architecture © Kim Christensen / DISSING + WEITLING Architecture

Bjarke Ingels Group’s LEGO House and DISSING + WEITLING’s Bicycle Snake have been recognized by the 2018 Danish Design Awards, an initiative which “highlights the impact and value of design, celebrates companies and designers across the country and showcases the difference their solutions make to industry, everyday life, and society at large.”

The LEGO House was victorious in the “Feel Good” category, while the Bicycle Snake was awarded the “Icon Award.”

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan

BIG’s LEGO House, completed in 2017 in Billund, Denmark, brought the toy scale of the classic LEGO brick to a human scale with exhibition spaces and public squares. The 130,000-square-foot (12,000-square-meter) scheme was praised by the jury as “a unique integration of play and learning, [designed] with an intuitive approach that successfully conveys the philosophy driving the company and the brand.”

© DISSING + WEITLING Architecture © DISSING + WEITLING Architecture © DISSING + WEITLING Architecture © DISSING + WEITLING Architecture

DISSING + WEITLING’s Bicycle Snake is situated around the Fisketorvet shopping center in Copenhagen, Denmark, designed to address safety and circulation issues between cyclists and pedestrians. The ramp and bridge chart a winding 600-foot (200-meter) course through the harbor area, balancing visual excellence with vital functionality.

The jury described the scheme as an “elegant and empathic solution [letting] cyclists cross the harbor in a safe and dignified manner, underlining the city’s profile as a sustainable metropolis with a pedal-powered profile.”

A full list of winners from the 2018 Danish Design Awards can be found on the official website here.

News via: Danish Design Awards

LEGO House / BIG

34 Project Leader Project Manager Snorre Nash PROJECT ARCHITECT, FACADES: Snorre Nash COWI, Dr. Lüchinger+Meyer Bauingenieure, Jesper Kongshaug, Gade & Mortensen Akustik, E-types Andreas Klok Pedersen, Agne Tamasauskaite, Annette Birthe Jensen, Ariel Joy Norback Wallner, Ask Hvas, Birgitte Villadsen, Chris Falla, Christoffer Gotfredsen, Daruisz Duong Vu Hong, David Zahle, Esben

Bicycle Snake / DISSING+WEITLING Architecture

30 Text description provided by the architects. The area around Fisketorvet shopping center has been characterized by a particular problem. Two distinctive groups of users, each with conflicting interests, cyclists and pedestrians. The cyclists needing to get easily from Kalvebod Brygge over to Island Brygge.